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Your Cats Health

1

Special Needs

Special Needs

If your cat has any of the following special needs, talk to your veterinarian about available products to cater to these needs:

  • Hairballs
  • Urinary Health
  • Sensitive Skin and Stomach
  • Indoor or Outdoor Lifestyles
  • Weight Management
  • Diabetes

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Diabetes

Diabetes

Diabetes is caused by a lack of insulin, the hormone that regulates how sugar is absorbed and used by cells and tissues in the body. Diabetic cats may eat and drink far more than normal and still lose weight. Increased urination is another sign of feline diabetes. The disorder can be managed with medicine and diet. If you notice any signs of extreme hunger or thirst in your cat, contact your veterinarian immediately.


3

Is Your Cat Vomiting?

Is Your Cat Vomiting?

Your cat may throw up occasionally in order to get rid of hairballs. Another explanation, and one of the most common reasons for vomiting, could be that your cat is eating too quickly. When cats eat too voraciously, they often swallow their kibble whole and end up gagging on it. The easiest way to slow down an overeager feline eater is to feed a larger kibble size so she has to take longer to chew and swallow. You can also try feeding smaller portions more often, or using a food distributor ball. Another cause of rapid eating is competition around the food bowl; if you have multiple cats, you may want to try feeding them in separate areas. If the problem continues, or if your cat is vomiting blood, call your veterinarian.


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Urinary Tract Issues

Urinary Tract Issues

A small percentage of cats seen by veterinarians have urinary problems of one type or another, either a cat Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) or a blockage. In some cases, cat urinary tract disease is caused by crystals or stones that form in the urine. These can irritate the lining of the urinary tract and partially or completely block the flow of urine. With both stones and urinary tract disease, urination may be painful and cause your cat to urinate outside the litter box, cry when urinating, strain in the litter box, or show signs of anxiety, like pacing or hiding. If you see these signs in your male cat, contact your veterinarian as soon as possible.


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Allergies and Intolerances

Allergies and Intolerances

Environmental contaminants, such as dust and mold, can cause allergies in a cat. If your cat is sneezing over and over again over the course of several days, contact a veterinarian to have her checked out.

Food can also cause allergies, although it takes time to make that diagnosis. Usually veterinarians will put a cat on a food elimination diet to determine if she has a food allergy. If her clinical signs improve on the hypoallergenic diet, she is then challenged with her original diet. If the cat is truly allergic to a particular food, there will likely be an increase in clinical signs, such as itching and inflamed skin. If these appear, further testing will be needed to determine which specific ingredients trigger the allergy symptoms.


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Other Digestive Issues

Other Digestive Issues

Diarrhoea and not eating are both common issues for cats. These symptoms can be caused by many different factors, including a change in diet, stress, parasites, or infections. Its difficult to tell whats wrong when a cat stops eating, vomits, or experiences diarrhoea. The best thing to do is contact your veterinarian and seek the advice of a professional, since some serious conditions can result in pain, distress, and life-threatening complications.