Sorry, you need to enable JavaScript to visit this website.
Your Pet, Our Passion.
Munsterlander Mobile

Munsterlander (Large)

Large Munsterlanders (or 'Munsters') are well-proportioned dogs who carry themselves well. Their coats are flowing and dense with a good deal of feathering on the legs and tail. Their smaller relations are more setter-like, but in all other aspects, apart from colouration, are similar in appearance. Large Munsterlanders are either black or blue roan with white, while the smaller version is brown (liver) and white or liver roan. The Large Munsterlander adult dog stands at 60-65cm and weighs about 25-29kg, and females are 58-63cm and around 25kg. The adult Small Munsterlander stands at 54cm for adult males and 52cm for females, with weight around 15-17kg.

The need-to-know
  • Dog suitable for owners with some experience
  • Some training required
  • Enjoys vigorous walks
  • Enjoys walking more than two hours a day
  • Large dog
  • Some drool
  • Requires grooming every other day
  • Non hypoallergenic breed
  • Chatty and vocal dog
  • Guard dog. Barks and alerts
  • Great with other pets
  • Great family dog
Munsterlander is standing on the grass

Personality

These lovable, affectionate dogs bond well with the family, other dogs and pets. The majority of them have great patience with children. Munsterlanders will, however, act as watch dogs when necessary and can be quite vocal. They are brave, eager to work and have a very gentle nature, wanting to please at all times. They need owners who will spend a lot of time and give plenty affection to them. They give the impression that they totally enjoy life and want their owners to do the same!

Munsterlander is standing on the grass in a warm summer morning

History and Origins

In the 1800s bird dogs in Germany came in all shapes, sizes and coat colours. In the latter part of the 19th century, because of the growing interest in the individual breeds, the different types were separated. When the German Long-Haired Pointer Club drew up its standards, for some reason, the only colour allowed was liver and white. Black and white puppies, many with excellent blood lines, were given away to farmers and hunters from the Munster area in Germany. Colour did not matter to them and, so these puppies were bred, possibly bringing in other breeds, e.g. spaniel or setter types, until in 1919 the Large Munsterlander dog breed was given recognition in his own right to differentiate him from the smaller version.

Dog with red collar looking out the window
Puppy advice
Everything you need to know
Getting a new puppy is incredibly exciting for all the family, but it can be quite scary for your new pup. Find out how to deal with everything from behaviour to health questions with our expert puppy advice.
Owner checking dogs collar
Puppy Advice
Welcoming your dog home
While you're waiting for the big day you may need to distract yourself, so luckily there are a few things you need to sort our before you welcome your new arrival.